Athletes

Current favorite piece/pieces of gear? Why?
The Atris skis by Black Crows. I can take them anywhere and I know I'll be able to shred whether the snow is awesome or really bad. And I like to wear the Black Crows Corpus jacket and pants, it's a 3-layer Gore Tex outfit with a big mountain touch, but it also works for touring and summits, it looks like a parka , I pretty much wear it all winter.

What’s your “Back in my day, we…”?
... we could handle skiing all day every day, sometimes in exotic locations, and then party at night where things would sometimes get intense and exotic as well!

Who has inspired your skiing the most?
It's not really a specific person, even though I had "ski heroes" when I was younger, but when I reached my 20s, what motivated me the most was the whole discovery and travel side of skiing. Reaching new peaks, discovering new lines... Skiing's the best excuse to try and lead as free a life as possible.

Best recovery exercises?
Hot lemon water and a sauna.

Ideal down day?
I can think of a few options, but nowadays, it would probably be watching a Korean movie in a small theater in the Latin quarter in Paris, then have a coffee on a terrasse.

Favorite on-mountain fuel/snack?
Well, I'm french, and I come from the mountains, so without any hesitation: saucisson, cheese and bread. In the sun please.

Spiciest/most intimidating line you've skied or ridden this year?
Nowadays and for the past ten years, ever since I launched Black Crows, I spend the better part of my days behind a computer. I have less time to ski but as soon as I get a window I get out there, I need it so bad, it's my whole life, but I'm also a mere office guy, as they say...This winter for the Warren Miller shoot, the most intense moment was probably when we were on the North Face of the Aiguille du Midi. The light was really poor and we had to wait close to an hour on the face to try and see the terrain. The light never came, but we had to go ahead and ski down regardless. I hadn't skied the North face all winter and it was actually almost pleasant...

Goals in skiing/riding this next year?
I'm planning on going back to the Himalayas for a high altitude expedition. I haven't been back in years because my schedule is too heavy but I definitely want to head there and experience these unique times again.

What’s a great book you’ve read recently?
It's a book called "Le Lambeau" by Philippe Lançon, a french journalist. It's a tough read, really intense. It tells the story of a journalist who comes back from the dead after being killed in the Charlie Hebdo massacre (terrorist attacks in January 2015 against french journalists). It talks of his pain and his metamorphosis. It's really well written. A great book on life.

Favorite mountain range?
Every morning, when I wake up in my hometown of Chamonix, I look out the window and I see the Aiguilles of Chamonix and the Mont Blanc Massif and I never get bored. They look intense and different every day, it's been like that since I'm a child!

Working title for the book or movie about your life?
The Metamorphosis

Best moment filming with WME this year?
There were so many good times but the best was probably to shoot for something as iconic as a Warren Willer production alongside my long-time friends Michael Schaffer and Bruno Compagnet, whom I co-founded Black Crows with. We've been friends for over 20 years and we skied together way before Black Crows existed, so being able to shoot together just adds another cool page to our story.

How did Warren Miller the man influence your skiing/riding career?
As a teen in France, it was really hard to get our hands any American ski movies, but I have flashbacks from old Warren Miller VHS where skiing seemed so gnarly and exciting! My ski club buddies and I would come across a movie and we'd head straight to the mountain to try just about anything! Those movies lead the way to skiing heaven!

Current favorite piece/pieces of gear? Why?
My skis, the interface between me and the snow

What’s your “Back in my day, we…”?
We partied all night, skied all day

Who has inspired your skiing the most?
Franz Klammer

Best recovery exercises?
A good bottle of wine, cheese and charcuterie shared with my ski partners

Ideal down day?
Lie in, a good book, a sauna, a healthy meal.

Favorite on-mountain fuel/snack?
A big piece of artisan bread, lard du Val d'Aosta, garlic

Spiciest/most intimidating line you've skied or ridden this year?
Face nord du col du plan

Goals in skiing/riding this next year?
To ski good snow far from the crowds in wild places.

What’s a great book you’ve read recently?
Le sabot du diable Ken Nhum.

Favorite mountain range?
The one which is yet to be discovered in perfect conditions.

Working title for the book or movie about your life?
The tracked mountain

Best moment filming with WME this year?
The day we spent in the sun on top l’aiguille du midi.

How did Warren Miller the man influence your skiing/riding career?
It was a vision of an alternative ski lifestyle which didn't yet exist in Europe. It made me realize a career as a professional Skibum was possible.

Current favorite piece/pieces of gear?
Volkl BMT 122, I am constantly impressed with how hard I ski this touring ski. Oh and my Stio Alpine Pullover because it's tight AF.

What’s your “Back in my day, we…”?
Didn't have cell phones. We'd just get dropped off at the hill and stay until we could get a ride home. Tickets were 5 bucks for the kids who didn't have passes and we knew about every deal, scam and free scrap of food you could find. We also had a sizable mental inventory of all the hot tubs we could poach. We called our selves the Alkasquawlics because we got after it every day we could (oh and we liked to party too). The ski hill was our home, we even slept in the locker rooms some nights. We had every feature mapped out so that we could get as many hits in as possible per lap. When it dumped, we went to work punching cliffs and pushing each other to try new tricks. Riding down mountains was all we thought about.

Who has inspired your skiing the most?
Skate films: "Chocolate Tour" and "Welcome to Hell." Snowboard films: "Decade" and "The Resistance." Ski Movies: "13" "Degenerates" and "Chapter 3." Skiers: Eric Pollard, Skogan Sprang, Mike Laroache, Candide Thovex.

Best recovery exercises?
Bike.

Ideal down day?
Just depends on how hard the beatings were leading up to it.

Favorite on-mountain fuel/snack?
Hi Ball Energy Water, it gets me fired up without the jitters of a strong coffee and I feel good about drinking it because the ingredients are organic and thoughtfully sourced. I'm also very addicted to the new Tender Belly pork jerky, it’s like a bacon in a bag. It's unreal.

Spiciest/most intimidating line you've skied or ridden this year?
The spiciest line was the first one I skied this winter at Points North Heli in AK. I decided to roll the dice and gap my slough on the first line of the trip (and it was my first legit line of the season), I turned a little low on the first take off because I wasn't quite skiing it with purpose and I hit a rock. I got bucked but somehow landed on my feet on my second take off and it popped me just perfectly out into the landing pad above the bergschrund.

Goals in skiing/riding this next year?
I just want to have fun and shred as hard as I can.

What’s a great book you’ve read recently?
The Way of Zen by Alan Watts.

Favorite mountain range?
Can't play favorites. I get very nostalgic thinking about the Sierra Nevadas but there are too many rad mountains to claim any one range.

The working title for the book or movie about your life?
“Let the Riding Do the Talking."

Best moment filming with WME this year?
The northern lights were as strong as I've ever seen them on our last night in AK. We stayed up late and jammed to the Dead and watched the show.

How did Warren Miller the man influence your skiing/riding career?
He must be one of skiing's most influential people of all time. I can't imagine that any other skier has been able to reach as many people as he has. I am certain that without Warren, the sport would be different than it is today. I am also certain that his films influenced a lot of the people I was influenced by. Major impact…

Current favorite piece/pieces of gear?
The new Tecnica Zero G Tour Pro boot is pretty ridiculous. So light and good to hike with, but still strong enough for proper shredding.

What’s your “Back in my day, we…”?
Back in the day I used to be drunk every day. Now I'm more into the skiing side of skiing…

Who has inspired your skiing the most?
It changes all the time. Through the years I've found inspiration in different styles, from Tomba to Nicolas Müller and everything between.

Best recovery exercises?
Small beer, small snack and small stretch.

Ideal down day?
The one that's followed by a pow day.

Favorite on-mountain fuel/snack?
I claim I'm doing the perfect sandwich. Dark toast bread, avocado, fried egg and some fine Swiss mountain cheese. I've been doing the same one for about five years, and still gets happy every time I eat it. #gettingold Ha ha.

Spiciest/most intimidating line you've skied or ridden this year?
Did a steep, hidden chute in Engelberg that turned into ice half way down it. Would have been fine if I hadn't massacred my edges on rocks the run before.

Goals in skiing/riding this next year?
I'm super keen on diving a little deeper into the big mountains around Engelberg. There are so many unknown and cool traverses to do around there. But I would lie if I said I'm not stoked to shred the resort more and harder to. There's something about laps with you buddies that a ski tour can't do. Also, since I'm from Sweden, I would really like to do some bigger spring exploring missions!

What’s a great book you’ve read recently?
Kristin Lavransdotter by Sigrid Undset.

Favorite mountain range?
I really like the northern alpine ridge and the Central Switzerland mountains. It's the variety I love. Some looks like the Dolomites, and some are jagged and pointy.

Working title for the book or movie about your life?
The world youngest old man.

Best moment filming with WME this year?
We had a pretty unreal sunrise moment at the top of Mount Titlis. There's something special about riding lifts and hiking in the dark to get to your spot. Way cooler than sunsets.

How did Warren Miller the man influence your skiing/riding career?
He seems to have been a man that, even if he did great things, never was about prestige. That's how I want to look at both skiing and my life - rather having fun than trying to do what other think is cool. That's when cool stuff happens.

Current favorite piece/pieces of gear? Why?
Helly Hansen outerwear because it looks fresh in the mountains.

What’s your “Back in my day, we…”?
We used to look at the lines we ski today, 

Who has inspired your skiing the most?
Dane Tudor and Richard Permin.

Best recovery exercises?
Hot tubbin’

Ideal down day?
Any day in Alaska waiting for perfect conditions.

Favorite on-mountain fuel/snack?
Peanut butter and jam sandwich.

Spiciest/most intimidating line you've skied or ridden this year?
A straight line in the backside of Red Mountain.

Goals in skiing/riding this next year?
Travel more and be in another ski movie. 

What’s a great book you’ve read recently?
Powder Magazine.

Favorite mountain range?
Purcell Mountains.

Working title for the book or movie about your life?
Who’s that guy?

Best moment filming with WME this year?
When the crew had to dig me out of a tree well.

How did Warren Miller the man influence your skiing/riding career?
He’s the OG for ski movies. 

Where did you grow up & where did you grow up skiing?
Grew up in Vågå Norway, and learned to ski at Lemonlake, the local ski center by the Jotunheimen National Park.

Current favorite piece/pieces of gear? Why?
ULLR Powder suit from Helly Hansen (keeps you dry and is really comfy) and Kästle BMX105 HP (an all-round ski that works in every condition).

What’s your “Back in my day, we…”?
Skied around Europe in a crappy car.

Who has inspired your skiing the most?
My Crazy cousin Øystein Bakke and of course Seth Morrison.

Best recovery exercises?
PlayStation and then a lot of hours in the gym.

Ideal down day?
At a trampoline park or playing tennis.

How did Warren Miller the man influence your skiing/riding career?
He gathered a lot of good people and showed the world what was possible. The WM movies have always been inspirational!

Train Like a Pro

For professional skiers, staying on top of the game is always a twelve month project. We asked a few stars from this year’s film about some of their most indispensable workouts for this summer.

For professional skiers, staying on top of the game is always a twelve month project. Skiing powder, high-speed lines, and stomping cliffs, whether for the cameras or just for fun, requires year rounf physical strength and conditioning both mentally and physically.

We asked a few stars from this year’s film about some of their most indispensible workouts for this summer. However, it’s not all your standard leg press or sandbag workouts: today’s athletes are open to a surprising array of ways to stay in peak physical form. Here, five top-level skiers give us a look into some surprising moves that keep them at their best through the summer months and even throughout the ski season.

 

JT HOLMES, professional skier, ski-BASE jumper, speed flyer

In the summer, I ride my bicycles, mountain bike, road bike, and my cruiser. I also hike my brains out seeking airtime in the mountains, for speed flying and BASE jumping. But before I do that, I stretch.

If I have only a little bit of time to stretch, I do pigeon pose [from yoga]: I do three to five-minute pigeon on each side, right leg and then left. And then I am ready to abuse my body all day long!

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/VE0xmsx6EkY

 

MILES SMART, IFMGA/UIAGM and AMGA mountain guide and heliski guide

I don't do any gym training, but for training in the off-season, I do a lot of cycling. I usually try to go on three or four big road rides a week, which can run about 60 to 120 miles, with 6,500 to 9,500 feet of climbing. This type of riding is really easy to find in the Alps where I live.

Another thing I've found to be helpful is stretching. I'm not into yoga, but the "downward dog" is a great stretch for tight hamstrings.

IMAGE: http://www.yogajournal.com/poses/491

 

INGRID BACKSTROM, professional skier

The one move that always seems to be in all of my dryland training workouts is the split lunge jump: you jump up and land in a lunge with one leg forward, knee at 90 degrees over your foot, and the back leg bends down so your back knee almost touches the floor. From here, jump up and switch legs all in one motion so the other one is now forward. 

I try to jump quickly but not so fast that I'm losing form--it should be a controlled movement, using the upward jump for power and the down for squeezing and control. The main thing is to keep the core engaged, back straight, and really use those glutes. I incorporate this into other workouts but generally try to do three sets of a minute each total. It never fails to make me sore! 

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/cdFyA89Kp0Y

For upper body (shoulders and core) I like the twisting side plank. Lay on your side and then push up to a partial plank on one elbow, with your entire body in a straight line (no sagging hips!), and feet stacked on top of each other with the top arm extended straight up in the air. Keeping your whole body still and core engaged, slowly reach down with the top arm, rotating down with your body simultaneously and reach the top arm all the way under your body towards whatever is behind you.

Your hips should stay facing forward the whole time and you should only be rotating from your trunk, it's sort of a squeezing and wringing out motion while keeping the plank. This is good for your upper back, shoulders, and core. I try to do a few sets of twelve on each side--it seems easy but it sneaks up on you after several if you are doing them properly--slow and controlled.

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/hwRmic0GF80

 

HEATHER PAUL, professional skier, globetrotter, and runner

My favorite thing to do in addition to trail running at least 4-5 times a week is to add a little spice to those runs...I add intervals to make me stronger and more fit cardiovascular-wise. This is a great way to make you stronger. I usually do it with friends. I pick out a landmark...like a tree up ahead in the distance, sprint to that tree at 110 percent and then walk for 30-50 seconds. Then I lunge to the next landmark, or walk, sprint, lunge, do butt kicks, or high knees. I basically like to do a few different things to keep it interesting, mostly full speed, ass-kicking sprints! 

Another great one I do all the time is a side plank with hip dips (25 each side) everyday. This helps you strengthen your core, which is amazing for staying injury-free and resilient.

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/j9X7owkYnag

 

CHRIS ANTHONY, professional skier and non-profit director

Over the years I have changed my workout a bit based on the recovery time and injuries I’m dealing with. What I have found the best is high intensity, low impact programs, while always switching it up so the body does not get in a routine. I also try to stay off the hard surfaces [such as pavement].

Most of this has been through a combination of classes, which are mostly dominated by women who make me feel weak, including barre ballet classes. I know what you are thinking but they are great for tuning in the small balance muscles, which are often ignored.

VIDEO: http://www.shape.com/fitness/workouts/home-barre-workout

I get outside and speed hike whenever I can. I have several hikes that between 25 - 35 minutes and almost straight up.  

My other go-to is biking, both road and mountain biking. I dig hills and speed as they both cause pain and fun. Lately, I have been spending time in Italy biking through the Julian Alps. People are more than welcome to join me on one of my trips.

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/X7cbXbW8pjg

Alaska Sphinx, Go Behind the Scenes of 65 with Chris Anthony

Chris Anthony checks in during a shoot for #65 in Alaska’s Chugach Mountains.

Chris Anthony checks in while filming in Alaska’s Chugach Mountains for the 2014 Warren Miller film. In the clip, athletes Ingrid Backstrom and Jess McMillan wait for the perfect conditions before they rip their lines.

From Chris:

The Group arrived at 10:30 AM and started the long set up. By the time the girls got to ski it was near 2:30. The girls sat on top for more than two and half hours waiting for everything to be perfect. This was after going through full safety checks.

This was one of those epic moments that will take maybe a few minutes in the film, but took almost all day to nail. The entire group admitted this day was meant for this to happen, as conditions could not have been more perfect. Moments like this are not planned. They are gifted. The crew sat for 6 days than had 3 days of amazing filming.

Warren Miller's Olympic Medalists

When we say that we seek out the world's best athletes for our movies, we're not kidding. Take a look at clips from past Warren Miller films that feature Sochi Olympic Medalists Bode Miller, David Wise, Julia Mancuso and Ted Ligety.

Bode Miller in 2003's Journey

 

Ted Ligety in 2012's Flow State

 

Julia Mancuso in 2013's Ticket to Ride

 

David Wise in 2012's Flow State

Eight Questions For Jeremy Bloom from SnoWorld 2010

The dual-sports phenom on the Olympics, old people and who to cheer for in the NFL.

An excerpt from SnoWorld magazine 2010.

Jeremy Bloom was just your typical Colorado kid-until he was 15, anyway. That's when he became the youngest member of the U.S. Freestyle Ski Team, and he's lived a charmed athletic life ever since. Never mind that he's a three-time World Champion mogul skier; Bloom is perhaps best known for his legal struggles with the NCAA, the famously byzantine organization that forced to abandon his role as a star wide receiver and punt returner with the University of Colorado football team because he was simultaneously pursuing a spot at the 2006 Olympic Winter Games as a sponsored skier. In the years since, Bloom has quit skiing, played in the NFL, started a business and a charity, and finally returned to skiing. We caught up with him as he was gearing up for a shot at his third Olympic Team and the 2010 Games in Vancouver.

How did growing up in Colorado shape who you are?
Growing up here was everything. I went to a normal high school with a great football program and then on weekends, two hours away, was fantastic, world-class skiing. The landscape alone made me. I'm a Colorado native, and for the few people who get to say that it always feels like a sacred title.

Do you consider yourself a Colorado lifer?
Absolutely. My friends are here. My family is here.

We heard that after the '06 Winter Games, you left all your ski gear in your hotel room in order to make it to the NFL camps on time. Did you think your skiing career was over at that point?
Yes. I thought I was completely done.

Yet here you are, training for your third Olympic team. If you qualify for Vancouver, do you think any of the shine will have come off being an Olympian?
Oh yea. It's not that I've lost any admiration for the Games. They're still the Olympics. But you go through a progression as an athlete. When I was 12, I thought the Games were the pinnacle of achievement, but the magic of that has changed. It doesn't occupy as much of my passion as it used to. That doesn't mean I'm going to slack - I've always been very goal-driven, so getting after it will come back pretty easily.

You have a reputation for involved training practices. What's the strongest thing you've done to train?
When I was preparing for the 2002 Olympics, I was living in the basement of my trainer's house, and I would have him do things such as wake me up at one in the morning so I could hike a mountain or go through a helacious plyometrics routine. I wanted to learn how to do my best when I felt my worst.

Your pro football career lasted two seasons and featured short stints with the Philadelphia Eagles and the Pittsburgh Steelers. Now that it's over, how do you see your time in the NFL?
If I could change anything, I would have started training for football earlier. The way it went down, I flew from the Torino Olympics directly to the football combine. Before the NCAA ruling, I was bouncing back and forth between sports and it was easier to stay healthy. But when I went from skiing directly to into football it was hard on my body. At training camp, you sprint about 10 miles a week. My body couldn't handle the switch. I tore my hamstring my rookie season. Then I broke my toe the next training camp and struggled the rest of the way. But just the experience of being on a team, of working with those guys, I wouldn't trade that for any gold medal in the world.

Explain your Wish-of-a-Lifetime Foundation.
It's the most important thing I've done in my life. I started it about a year and a half ago. The goal is to enrich the lives of low-income seniors, to grant them a wish. Sometimes these are simple but incredibly meaningful wishes. We flew one woman from her home in Colorado to Arizona so she could spend time with her daughter who is dying of cancer. Right now we have a woman who wants to go skydiving, and we're working with the Air Force to make it happen.

Last question. Eagles are playing the Steelers: Who do you root for? The Broncos?
That's a tough question. I'll tell you this. The Steelers have the best organization and head coach in all of sports. Philly has the craziest fans. And the Broncos had the best quarterback in history.

Thank you for your measured response, Mr. Senator.

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